Posts Tagged ‘eggs’

Brunch Bunch Brawlers – Part II

Brunch locations in New York City are endless, and every week I attempt to find a different restaurant to please my palette and help my friends, aka fellow Brunch Bunch Brawlers, experience a more-than satisfying culinary excursion. I shall continue the recap with our visit to Morandi on Waverly. In doing the dining research, the menu is the first link to click, so the atmosphere is sometimes a surprise. Since looks are usually the first impression, we knew this was going to be good. Marry brick and wood, and it puts

me in a time machine to where I feel most comfortable reverting. The menu items delivered the same rustic promise:

  • Focaccia “occhio di bue”*: with a sunny-side egg, pancetta & pecorino
  • Burrata e zucca: burrata cheese with roasted delicata squash, arugula & toasted pumpkin seeds
  • Con semi di zucca: whole grain toast with hard boiled egg, avocado
  • Campanelle alla norma: bell-shaped pasta with tomato, roasted eggplant & mozzarella

An extreme desire to drive to Morandi right now has overtaken my typing fingers.

Our next brunch pilgrimage was based on location. Spring had just sprung, and a walk in Central Park was in order. Along comes the marmalade institution known as Sarabeth’s with a new location overlooking the park and next to the Plaza Hotel. Of course with the locational perk comes a higher price tag, but it was a great diversion from our more casual spots and the quality warranted it. Busy, busy, busy – everyone knows the name apparently. The front dining room was all abuzz and would not have been my preference with hungry patrons milling around restlessly waiting for others to finish. Although the back dining room loses the park view, there’s a courtyard in view as a consolation.

The menu is true brunch with triple choices of “extraordinary egg” selections, sweet breakfasts and lunchie sandwiches.

  • SALMON EGGS BENEDICT: smoked salmon, hollandaise, peppers, chives
  • The popular new kid on the block (these might have been fluffier than Locanda Verde – see Brunch 1) – LEMON & RICOTTA PANCAKES: blackberries, organic maple syrup
  • HAM & TURKEY CLUB SANDWICH: bacon jam, manchego, avocado on a croissant
  • CRAB MEAT GUACAMOLE & CHIPS: cilantro, lime, jalapeño
  • A scone, muffin and preserves and butter

It looks like a lot, but we walked it off in the park.

This rustic, cash-only sister of Frank’s on 2nd Ave. is on 2nd Street! Supper is for brunch, and so simply enjoyable it was that we brawlers – a different combo – went two weeks in a row. But this Northern Italian fare doesn’t have a Northern Italian flair when it comes to eggs. How can it? It’s eggs, but it is innovative.

That flair kicks in on the basic pastas and creative pretend pasta, which somehow taste better when you sit in the glass-window fronted room and watch the foot traffic.

 

 

And server Simone is a sight for sore eyes ladies, but you’ll have to wait for supper to see him now at Supper, no more at Frank’s.

And here’s one more to wrap up this second installation of the Brunch Bunch Brawlers. Palma holds generations of family recipes in its palm and holds my tummy for being right around the corner from my favorite Pasticceria. The white stucco walls seem more Greek, but the bright rear of the restaurant is an indoor/outdoor garden.P1040994

Agnolotti Ricotta e Spinaci – homemade pasta filled with spinach and buffalo ricotta, served with basil and tomato sauce

Brunch requires pancakes/waffles or French toast. Here it was French Toast with mascarpone and fresh fruit, finished
with maple syrup even if Rocco’s desserts were steps away.

Stay tuned for episode 3, as I try to keep up!

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Verboten Broten

Forbidden Bread: In today’s society of scandalous starch and refuting gluten, how does Sullivan Street Bakery survive? First, it’s people like me who revere crunchy-crusted, airy-centered fresh-baked breads as works of art to be idolized. Instead of admiring the loaves with my eyes and nose, however, my mouth engulfs it and removes it from IMG_5619possible display. I literally could eat a special loaf with just some EVOO (or even plain) as an entire dessert meal.

My first exposure to this delicacy (yes, I just referred to a raised ball of yeast as a delicacy) was at Mario Batali’s Babbo Ristorante. My then boyfriend Daniel and I needed to know if they were creating this crispy wonder since everything else brought to the table was fresh, high-quality food. The server gave up the provider – the secret of Sullivan Street Bakery. I know can almost always identify the overwhelming amount of restaurants that provide us diners with such a free opening treat.

The next time we were wandering the Village, we walked down Sullivan Street looking for the bakery to buy our own samples to enjoy at home, but no such luck. We did not know that Sullivan Street Bakery was no longer on Sullivan Street. According to the web site, Sullivan Street Bakery was founded in 1994 in New York City.  In 2000, the bakery moved to Hell’s Kitchen. And since then, they opened a cafe to the public in Chelsea on 9th Ave. to enjoy breakfast/brunch-style servings incorporating their breads!

Today, I had a carb craving. After all, I played tennis in the morning. There was a parking space practically out front. The different breads jutted out from racks on the wall like a beautiful sculpture. Two stools opened up at the counter, and a friend and I eagerly sat ready for someone to offer up the best options. Nobody behind the counter paid attention though. A kind regular patron told me to go to the register a few feet away and order. I found that a bit bothersome. The young man at the register made me feel compelled to try am Uovo in Coppetta though (poached egg bowl). I selected the AL CONTADINO – two poached eggs, toasted Truccione Sare bread, butternut squash, cipollini onion, fingerling potato, herbs, lemon oil. THIS made me experience a different kind of Flour Power!

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I’m also a sucker for a good butternut squash soup because I enjoy cooking my own. Even though this could’ve been slightly thicker, the pieces of sour apple and toasted pumpkin seeds gave it a different spin. As luck would have it, the kitchen accidentally made two instead of one bowl, so guess who enjoyed that? I needed a sandwich to truly experience their bread. The young man suggested ANINI D’UOVO (served on their Strecci bread) – The Originale: with soft-cooked eggs, crisp Prosciutto di Parma, demi-sec tomato, basil. So simple. So good. And just because it had the words “Roast Pork” in the description, I sampled that sandwich as well; it was very good but surprisingly my least favorite of the selections if I had to choose.

I always ask at a New York City dining establishment when I think their bread is provided by Sullivan Street because I want to confirm how identifiable its goodness is. I am mostly correct except one time I was fooled at Il Buco, where it turns out they used to be supplied by SSB, but decided they could make their own. Watch out Sullivan Street; they had ME fooled.IMG_5564

Circling back to the opening where I mention dessert, while the dessert items such as the bomboleno were tempting and I did taste their artistic cappuccino with swirly design, the Little Pie Company was only a six-minute drive! A seasonal pear apple crumb and the traditional high-covered old-fashioned apple pie were tasty, but don’t ask for it warm. The microwave “melts” the pie crust and steals the flaky, crispy texture that defines its excellence.

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The metaphor I used is ironic for I just found out that “Jim Lahey studied sculpture before learning the art of bread baking in Italy. When he returned to New York City in 1994, he opened Sullivan St Bakery in Soho with little more than the wild yeast he hand-cultivated in Italy and a desire to bring the craft of small-batch bread baking to America.”

In Search of Pie to Die For, Part II – The Stairway

It was only three days after I found a most delicious baker of pies in Southern Bergen County, New Jersey, and wrote this blog post, that I made a new discovery and found the stairway to the golden gate of the apple pie in the sky. It is nearly heavenly, but again, only Mom’s pies will ever be worthy of that adjective. I will not reveal a secret component.

To reiterate, unfortunately, Mom is under temporary medical care at a hospital in Northern Bergen County. I visit her daily, and food always seems to help improve the mood. Monday it was my homemade lasagna with ground turkey and broccoli. It was that same day I received a local news eblast and was attracted to a headline about a local farm making cider donuts for the season. It brought me over to this story on the best cider donuts from Bergen County farms: http://mahwah.dailyvoice.com/lifestyle/farm-fresh-these-four-places-have-bergens-best-cider-doughnuts/724031/. Not a huge donut fan, I was till piqued by the thought of the taste of the “best” of them. Coincidentally, the number one place, Abma’s Farm, was just half mile from where I had to go to see my Mom! The farm name is familiar to me because of a local supermarket’s long-standing partnership with this family of farmers for their produce.

Complete with an actual petting zoo, greenhouse and country store, Abma’s has been running for nine decades, and I’m ashamed to say it was my first time there. I am thrilled when I hear about the longevityIMG_5027 of a local family business. It warms my heart, and in this case, my belly. I walked into the market, doused with that country feel and in search of these outstanding donuts, and what did my wandering eyes see – PIES, rows of pies with golden, well-baked crusts and ingredients straight from the ground of this farm I was walking around on. What donuts? I saw good old covered apple pie with an open center (Erie did not have traditional basic pies, rather a little fancier on the flavors).

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There was a tug of war going on between the apple and the Swedish apple, which had walnuts as well, along with a baked crumble topping. According to Abma’s, they bake everything from scratch. All of their fresh ingredients are preservative free. They pride ourselves in baking the finest homemade pies, muffins, breads and treats from their own homegrown fruits and vegetables.

I hurried back to the office to share this Swedish Apple key to the gate but needed some IMG_5028unbiased opinions. It was unanimous! — This is among the best pies that my associates have tasted. A friend even called it, “Nearly as good as your Mom’s!” That’s huge! Not only do they have the freshest ingredients, but somebody there knows how to bake with them! Don’t they go hand in hand. What did they have the edge on — the edge! The crimped crust at Erie’s was a bit thicker and at moments was a little hard to get a fork through. I didn’t mind because fingers were used to break it off. But I favor the thinner, flakier pinched edge, even though both were browned to near perfection.

Take a trip and explore the bottom of the stairway leading to the golden pies. Other varieties included pumpkin (and pumpkin walnut), harvest (apple, cranberry, peach) and pecan. While you’re there, explore the homemade soups, eggs from their hens, and lunch and dinner options. Say hello or goodbye to the barnyard animals because you will be back.